ALIPURDUAR


Alipurduar district has been carved out from Jalpaiguri on 25th June, 2014 as the 20th district in the state of West Bengal, India. It consists of Alipurduar municipality and six community development blocks viz Madarihat–Birpara, Alipurduar–I, Alipurduar–II, Falakata, Kalchini and Kumargram. There are 66-gram panchayats and nine census towns in six blocks. The district has its headquarters at Alipurduar. It comprises mainly of a rural population. More than 80 per cent of its total population belong to SC/ST community.
Geographically Alipurduar is a land locked district bordered by Jalpaiguri in the west, Assam in the east and Coochbihar in the south. In the north the district shares an international border line with Bhutan. The topography of the land is cut across by rivers, streams and hills, and covered with tea gardens and forests. Major rivers that runs across the district are the Torsa, Raidak, Kaljani, Sankosh and Gadadhar.

District website: https://alipurduar.gov.in/aboutus.html



BANKURA


Bankura is in the western part of the State of West Bengal. It is a part of Bardhaman Division of the State and included in the area known as “Rarh” in Bengal. It ranks 4th according to Population and literacy rate of 2001 Census in the State. The District Bankura is bounded by latitude 22038’ N and longitude 86036’ E to 87047’ E. River Demodar flows along the northern boundary of the district. The adjacent districts are Bardhaman in the north, Purulia in th west and Paschim Medinapure in the south.

District website: https://bankura.gov.in/

 

BIRBHUM


Birbhum is the northernmost District of the Burdwan Division. It lies between 23 32′ 30″ and 24 35′ 0″ north latitude and 88 1′ 40″ and 87 5′ 25″ east longitude. In shape it looks like an isosceles triangles. The apex is situated at the northern extremity not far south of point where the Ganges and the hills of the Santhal Paraganas begin to diverge while the river Ajay forms the base of this triangle. Birbhum is bounded on the north and west by Santhal Paraganas, on the east by the districts of Murshidabad and Burdwan and on the south by Burdwan, from which it is separated by the Ajay river. The district extends over an area of 4545 Sq. Kms.

District website: https://birbhum.gov.in/




COOCH BEHAR


In course of time, Cooch Behar has been transformed from a kingdom to a State and from a State to the present status of a district. Before 28th August 1949, Cooch Behar was a Princely State ruled by the king of Cooch Behar, who had been a feudatory ruler under British Government. By an agreement dated 28th August, 1949 the king of Cooch Behar ceded full and extensive authority, jurisdiction and power of the state to the Dominion Government of India. The transfer of administration of the state to the Govt. of India came into force on 12th September, 1949. Eventually, Cooch Behar was transferred and merged with the province of West Bengal on 19th January, 1950 and from that date Cooch Behar emerged as a new District in the administrative map of West Bengal.

District Website: http://www.coochbehar.gov.in/

 

DAKHIN DINAJPUR


The district of West Dinajpur came into existence in August 1947 with the partition of Bengal. The province of Bengal was divided into two parts in accordance with the partition. The dividing line passed through the district of Dinajpur, the portion lying to the west of the line being named West Dinajpur. There is no local tradition regarding the origin of the name Dinajpur, and it is also rather difficult to advance any satisfactory theory about the origin of the name.
The district of West Dinajpur comprised an area, which in ancient times formed a part of the kingdom of Pundravardhana, the country of the Pundras. According to Brihatkathakosha of Harishena, Bhadrabahu (the Jaina guru of Chandragupta Maurya) was the son of a Brahmin of Kotivarsha in Pundravardhana.

District Website: https://ddinajpur.nic.in/


DARJEELING


The name ‘Darjeeling’came from the Tibetan words,’dorje’meaning thunderbolt (originally the scepter of Indra) and ‘ling’a place or land, hence ‘the land of the thunderbolt’. A land-mark year in the History of Darjeeling was 1835, but it would be appropriate to trace its History before that. Prior to its acquisition by the East India Co. in 1835, Darjeeling formed a part of Sikkim and for a brief period of Nepal. However neither the history of Sikkim, nor the history of Nepal furnish any account of its early history.

District Website: https://darjeeling.gov.in/



HOOGHLY


Hooghly district is one of the districts of the Indian State of West Bengal. The district is named after the river Hooghly. The headquarters of the district are at Hooghly-Chinsura. There are fouyr sub divisions : Chinsura Sadar, Serampore, Chandannagar and Arambag.

 
District Website: https://hooghly.nic.in/



HOWRAH


The history of the city of Howrah dates back over 500 years, but the district is situated in an area historically occupied by the ancient Bengali kingdom of Bhurshut. Venetian explorer Cesare Federici, who travelled in India during 1565–79, mentioned a place called Buttor in his journal circa 1578. As per his description, this was the a location into which large ships could travel (presumably the Hoogli River) and perhaps a commercial port. This place is identifiable with the modern day neighbourhood of Bator. Bator was also mentioned in the Bengali poetry Manasamangal written by Bipradas Pipilai in 1495.

District Website: https://howrah.gov.in/



JALPAIGURI


Jalpaiguri district comprises western Dooars and the major part of the eastern Morang and this area, according to Sailen Debnath, in the ancient time was a part of the kingdom of Kamrup, and since the middle of the seventh century it became a part of Kamarupa Sailen writes that three of the five ancient capitals of Kamatapur were geographically in the district of Jalpaiguri; and the three capitals were at Chilapata, Mainaguri and Panchagarh in sequence. According to him, Hingulavas, the first capital of the next Koch kingdom as well was in Jalpaiguri district. Hingulavas has well been identified with Mahakalguri in Alipurduar Sub-Division. The district situated in the northern part of West Bengal has international borders with Bhutan and Bangladesh in the north and south respectively and district borders with Darjeeling hills in the west and northwest and Alipurduar district and Cooch Behar district on the east.

District Website: http://www.jalpaiguri.gov.in/



JHARGRAM


Jhargram is a district in the state of West Bengal, India.The district lies between the Kangsabati River in the north and the Subarnarekha in the south. Jhargram has one of the lowest population densities among the districts of West Bengal, with almost all its population living in rural areas. It is a popular tourist destination known for its sal forests, elephants, ancient temples and royal palaces.[1] The district was formed on 4 April 2017, after bifurcation from the Paschim Medinipur district as the 22nd district of West Bengal.[2] The district has its headquarters at Jhargram.

District Website : https://jhargram.gov.in/


KALIMPONG


Kalimpong became an important centre for trade with Tibet due to the closeness of the town to the Jelepla Pass which allowed access to Central Tibet. The British government decided to open up Kalimpong as an alternative Hill Station to Darjeeling. The coming of the Scottish Missionaries who did significant work for the development of Kalimpong, and The British Government opened up Kalimpong for settlers from other places who came in large numbers and with their hard work and skill made Kalimpong what it is today.
Kalimpong offered easy access to the Chumbi Valley of Tibet via the Jelepla Pass, which is about a 100 km away from Kalimpong town. Hence trade with Tibet was channelized through Kalimpong. Musk, wool, fur, food grains, etc, that were carried on mules, were traded in Kalimpong. This sudden economic prosperity of the town attracted the plainsmen and others to flock into Kalimpong. The decision to develop Kalimpong as a hill station too prompted well-to-do families from the plains and as well as British Officers to frequent and build summer cottages in Kalimpong.
The economic development of Kalimpong took a back seat following the Chinese aggression in 1962 after which trade through Jelepla was closed. Today, Kalimpong relies mostly on the business generated by the educational institutes, tourism and agriculture but it still retains its peaceful and relaxed way of life. The 2011 census puts the population of Kalimpong sub-division (now a full-fledges district) at 2,51,642 while the population of the town is 49,403.

District Website : https://kalimpong.gov.in/

KOLKATA


Kolkata district lies between 22.037’ and 22.030’ North latitude and 88.023’ and 88.018’ East longitude. It occupies the east bank of the Hooghly in the lower Ganges Delta. The alluvial plain has an average elevation of 6.4 metres (17 feet) above mean sea level. A large part of the district comprises land reclaimed from wetland. The existing East Kolkata Wetlands has been designated a “wetland of international importance” by the Ramsar Convention.
Kolkata district is bounded by the North 24 Parganas district on the north and on the east, South 24 Parganas district on the south and Howrah district, across the Hooghly, on the west.
In terms of area, it is the smallest amongst all the districts of West Bengal but has the highest density of population. It is the only district in the state with cent percent urban population. It has the lowest Scheduled Caste (5.38%) and Scheduled Tribe (0.24%) population in the state. Kolkata district is the only district in the state with a negative growth rate (−1.7%) for the 2001–2011 decade. Kolkata district has the second highest literacy rate (86.3%) in the state.
Kolkata metropolitan area, extending over an area of 1851.41 km2, is one of the six metropolitan areas in India. It includes the entire Kolkata Municipal Corporation area.
The Kolkata district collector is responsible for several citizen centric services which are neither being provided by the KMC nor Kolkata Police.

District Website: https://www.kmcgov.in/KMCPortal/jsp/KMCPortalHome1.jsp



MALDA


Malda district, also spelt Maldah or Maldaha (Bengali: [malda], [maldɔɦ], often [maldɔɦo]), is a district in West Bengal, India. It lies 347 km (215 miles) north of Kolkata, the capital of West Bengal. Mango, jute and silk are the most notable products of this district. The special variety of mango, Fazli, produced in this region is popularly known by the name of the district and is exported across the world and is internationally acclaimed. The folk culture of gombhira is a feature of the district, being a unique way of representation of joy and sorrow in daily life of the common people, as well as the unique medium of presentation on national and international matters. According to the National Investigation Agency Malda is believed to be a hub of a fake currency racket.It is reported that 90 percent of the fake currency that enters India originates in Malda.
The headquarters of Malda district is in English Bazar, also known as Malda, which was once the capital of Bengal. The district maintains the traditions of the past in culture and education. Old Malda, the town which lies just east of the confluence of the Mahananda and Kalindi Rivers, is part of the English Bazar metropolitan city. The town rose to prominence as the river port of the old capital of Pandua. During the 18th century, it was the seat of prosperous cotton and silk industries. It remains an important distribution centre for rice, jute, and wheat. The area between the historical monument of Jame Masjid (1566) and the landmark of Nimasarai Tower across the river Mahananda, constituted a municipality in 1867. Rice, jute, legumes, and oilseed are the chief crops in the surrounding area. Malda is the largest producer of excellent quality jute in India. Mulberry plantations and mango orchards also occupy large areas; mango trade and silk manufacture are the main economic activities.

District Website: https://www.malda.gov.in/index.php/

MURSHIDABAD


The name 'Murshidabad' was derived from the place known as 'Muksudabad' which was the capital of Bengal during the reign of Murshid Quli Khan. The city of Murshidabad was the capital of Bengal before the advent of the British. It has significance in Indian history because the British defeated Sirajuddaula at the Battle of Plassey in 1757, after which the whole nation was brought under British colonial rule. Even after the conquest of Bengal by the British, Murshidabad remained in the seat of administration for some time. The city still bears the memory of the Nawabs, including mosques, tombs and gardens, and retains the arts such as ivory, gold and silver embroidery, and silk weaving. Of interest is Nizamat Qila (Fortress of the Nawabs) which is also known as Hazarowari Palace (Palace of One Thousand Doors), Moti Jheel (Lake of Pearls), Muradbagh Palace and Khushbagh Cemetery.

District Website : https://murshidabad.gov.in/bn/


NADIA


The geographical boundary of Nadia district comprises Bangladesh in the East,Bardhaman and Hugli district on the West,Murshidabad district on the North and North West and North 24 Parganas towards South and South East. Situated on the main rail route connecting Howrah/Kolkata and New Jalpaiguri(NJP) including parts of North Eastern states, the Nadia district can easily be accessed by rail. The major railway stations are Nabadwip Dham,Ranaghat and others with regular trains to Kolkata/Howrah/NJP/Guwahati. The International Rail Link connecting India and Bangladesh passes through Nadia District with Gende as the last railway station at Indian Border. Bifurcated by National Highway-34 on the North and East, the district can also be accessed by road from other parts of the country.


District Website : http://nadia.gov.in/index.html



PASCHIM BARDHAMAN


The rocky undulating topography with laterite soil found in Paschim Bardhaman district is a sort of extension of the Chota Nagpur plateau. For ages the area was heavily forested and infested with plunderers and marauders. The discovery of coal in the 18th century led to industrialisation. Most of the forests in the coal-bearing areas have been cleared but some areas in the eastern part of the district remained thickly forested till more recent times and some are still there. The eastern part of the district gradually slopes down to the rice plains of the agriculturally rich Purba Bardhaman district

District Website : https://paschimbardhaman.gov.in/



PURBA BARDHAMAN

Purba Bardhaman district is a flat alluvial plain area that can be divided into four prominent topographical regions. On the north, the Kanksa Ketugram Plain lies along the Ajay, which joins the Bhagirathi. The Bardhaman Plain occupies the central area of the district, with the Damodar on the south and the south-east. On the southern part is the Khandaghosh Plain. The Bhagirathi flows along the eastern boundary of the district, and the Bhagirathi Basin occupies the eastern part of the district. The undulating laterite topography of Paschim Bardhaman district extends up to Ausgram area of this district

District Website: https://purbabardhaman.nic.in/



PURULIA


Purulia lies between 22.60 degrees and 23.50 degrees north latitudes and 85.75 degrees and 86.65 degrees east longitudes. Compass Declination 022'W. The geographical area of the district is 6,259 km2 (2,417 sq mi). This district is bordered on the east by Bankura, Paschim Medinipur districts, on the north by Bardhaman district of West Bengal state and Dhanbad district of Jharkhand state, on the west by Bokaro and Ranchi districts of Jharkhand state and on the south by West Singhbhum and East Singhbhum districts of Jharkhand state.
Purulia is the westernmost district of West Bengal with an all-India significance because of its tropical location, its shape as well as function like a funnel. It funnels not only the tropical monsoon current from the Bay to the subtropical parts of north-west India, but also acts as a gateway between the developed industrial belts of West Bengal and the hinterlands in Odisha, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh.

District Website: http://www.purulia.gov.in/index.html




UTTAR DINAJPUR

The District of Uttar Dinajpur ( view map) came into existance on 1st April,1992 after the bifurcation of erstwhile West Dinajpur District.The District lies between latitude 25o11' N to 26o49' N and longitude 87o49' E to 90o00' E occupying an area of 3142 Sq. Km enclosed by Bangladesh on the East,Bihar on the West,Darjeeling & Jalpaiguri District on the North and Malda District on the South. Uttar Dinajpur is well connected with the rest of the State through National Highways, State Highways and Railways. NH-31 and NH-34 passes through the heart of the district.The regional topography is generally flat with a gentle southerly slope towards which the main rivers like Kulik, Nagar,Mahananda etc flow.
The Distict forms a part of the basin lying between Rajmahal hills on the East. The older alluvium is estimated to be Pleistocene age.Uttar Dinajpur is bestowed with a very fertile soil.The soil is very rich in nature due to the alluvial deposition which helps to grow Paddy,Jute,Mesta and Sugarcane etc.

District Website: http://www.uttardinajpur.gov.in/

 

PURBA MIDINAPUR


Purba Medinipur district is part of the lower Indo-Gangetic Plain and Eastern coastal plains. Topographically, the district can be divided into two parts – (a) almost entirely flat plains on the west, east and north, (b) the coastal plains on the south. The vast expanse of land is formed of alluvium and is composed of younger and coastal alluvial. The elevation of the district is within 10 meters above the mean sea level.
District Website: https://purbamedinipur.gov.in/



BARUIPUR, Sub DIC


Baruipur is a city and a municipality in South 24 Parganas district in the state of West Bengal. Baruipur is 25 km from Sealdah Station. As an urban setup in the vicinity of Kolkata, the town is within the area of Greater Kolkata. Baruipur is well connected with Roadways and Railways. Buses like CTC, CSTC, Private Buses, and STA Buses are available all the time in Baruipur. Auto-rickshaw also is an important life-line of connectivity. Besides this, Baruipur plays as an important junction in the railway sector. The nearest metro station is Kavi Nazrul is almost 14 km from Baruipur.
District Website: http://s24pgs.gov.in/block/baruipur/about_block



SOUTH 24 PARGANAS


South 24 Parganas is, indeed, a complex district, stretching from the metropolitan Kolkata to the remote riverine villages upto the mouth of Bay of Bengal, Apart from its staggering size and population, the district administration has to contend with problems typical of metropolitan living in the urban area&mdashsuch as high population density and overload civic infrastructure&mdashand in complete contrast, in the rural area the lack of transport and communication facilities and weak delivery systems. 84% of the population lives in the rural areas, where development is taken care of by the panchayat bodies. The remaining 16% population is looked after by the Kolkata Municipal Corporation and seven municipalities. The scheduled caste comprises 39% of the total population and B.P.L. families constitute 37.21% of the population.

The Sundarbans, the largest mangrove forests on earth, are spread over thirteen of the twenty-nine development blocks in the district. Due to its peculiar geographical location and the dictates of geography, the means of transport and communication in this region are not well developed, with all the attendant consequences. Lack of irrigation has meant mono-cropped agriculture. Breaches in earthen embankments and cyclonic storms mean loss of life and destruction of crops and property on a regular basis. Any development strategy in this ecologically fragile environment must be carefully designed and implemented.

District Website: https://s24pgs.gov.in/home



NORTH 24 PARGANAS


The district of North 24-Parganas with its administrative headquarters at Barasat comprises five Sub-divisions viz. Barasat, Barrackpore, Bongaon, Bashirhat and Bidhannagar. The district is bounded by Nadia district in the north, South 24-Parganas in the south, Bangladesh in the east and keeps the Hooghly district, the river Hooghly and Kolkata at the west. The district of North 24-Parganas has an international border with Bangladesh in the east spreading for about 230 Km. The district with an area of 4094 sq Km, has a population of 10009781 as per 2011 census and thus shows the highest density with 2445 persons per sq. Km. among all the districts in the State.
It may be mentioned that there were no existence of a district named North Twenty Four Parganas that we hear now. The district was named Twenty Four Parganas only. It was only in the year 1986 this district was carved out from the erstwhile Twenty Four Parganas district.

District Website: http://north24parganas.gov.in/index.php